A Recap of This Week’s Top News – September 29, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider to be some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, September 23, to Friday, September 29. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

General News:

  • According to an article by NPR, a government shutdown is a likely to be announced this weekend as a budget deal still far from passing. The shutdown would have wide-reaching implications for people across the country, from furloughs for some government employees to the possible pause of SNAP and WIC benefits and the closing of national parks.

Education News:

  • Following the Supreme Court’s recent decision to eliminate race-based admissions in colleges and universities across the country, the Biden Administration has released a report with suggested measures to promote diversity on college campuses. The report asked colleges to provide “meaningful consideration” to experiences like “financial hardship and personal experiences of racial discrimination,” said an article in the Washington Post.
  • Described as one of the “strongest protections yet for students,” Biden’s gainful employment rule aims to warn students against low-performing college programs— aiming to save them time and money. According to an article on the topic in USA Today, the administration issued the final version of the rule this week.

Health News:

  • This week Biden Administration restarted its program to provide four free COVID-19 tests per household in preparation for a possible surge of cases in the fall and winter seasons, according to ABC News.
  • Thousands of children experience hearing loss every year, and the high costs associated with hearing aids are not going unnoticed by parents. According to an article by CNN, just 26 states have enacted mandates that require insurance companies to cover the cost of hearing aids for children.
  • A recent study by the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed there is a higher risk of developing dementia for people who are seated for long periods of time, even if they exercise. The study describes “how pervasive the consequences of sitting can be, affecting our minds, as well as our bodies, and they hint that exercise by itself may not be enough to protect us,” said a Washington Post article on the study.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – September 15, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider to be some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, September 9, to Friday, September 15. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Education News:

  • As students start to pay federal loans after the pandemic hiatus, the Department of Education is working to market the Biden Administration’s Saving on A Valuable Education (SAVE) repayment plan. According to a USA Today article, the Department is partnering with over 100 organizations to reach borrowers. The plan lessens accruing interest and monthly payments for some borrowers.
  • According to a recent article by The New York Times, almost half of America’s big universities require that prospective professors and faculty fill out a diversity statement as a part of their application. While critics argue that the requirement forces certain ideals onto staff, those in support say that requiring the statements in the hiring process helps ensure that new faculty and staff are prepared to create a welcoming environment for students of all backgrounds.

Health News:

  • On Monday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two updated COVID-19 shots. By Tuesday, the new shots were endorsed by advisers to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention. According to an article by AP News, doctors are encouraging the public to get vaccinated in order to prevent another “tripledemic” of the flu, COVID-19, and RSV this winter season.
  • A recent Q&A column in The New York Times advised that while you can’t offset the negative health effects of drinking alcohol, you can help maintain your health by prioritizing other healthy actions—such as eating nutritious food, going to your yearly doctor’s visit, supporting your immune system, and drinking “mindfully” when you consume alcohol.
  • According to an article by AP News, FDA said that widely used decongestants, like some versions of Sudafed and Dayquil, are not effective.. The main ingredient in these medicines—phenylephrine (sometimes marked PE)—does not adequately improve congestion. Experts recommend that people searching for decongestion relief should switch to behind the counter products containing pseudoephedrine instead.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – September 8, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider to be some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, September 2, to Friday, September 8. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Education News:

  • Florida’s public university system, including the University of Florida and Florida State University, is expected to become the first state system to approve the Classic Learning Test (CLT) for use in admissions. The CLT is an alternative to the SAT or ACT, emphasizing Western canon and Christian thought.
  • The U.S. Education Secretary, Miguel Cardona, recently stated that the digital divide is the “equity issue of our moment,” citing that internet access is “the new pencil” and crucial to student success.
  • A lawsuit filed against Yale in 2021 over its affirmative action policies was dropped on Thursday after the university agreed to make some of the most significant and wide-reaching changes to its admissions policies due to the Supreme Court’s ruling on race-conscious admissions, financial aid, and data transparency.

Health News:

  • Although a late summer COVID-19 wave was anticipated, it is still harder to track due to the end of federal case tracking and the increasing prevalence of at-home testing, leaving only hospitalization rates and wastewater analyses to monitor the spread.
  • A new study shows that some marijuana users may have elevated levels of lead and cadmium in their blood and urine. Both of these heavy metals are linked to long-term health issues. Chronic exposure to these metals can increase the risk of high blood pressure, heart problems, and kidney damage.
  • Researchers have determined that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with a higher incidence of anorexia, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and even the risk of suicide attempts. The lead study author noted that impulsivity, a core component of ADHD, is also closely associated with suicidal behavior.
  • Narcan, the nasal spray that reverses opioid overdoses, is now available to purchase over the counter. Major retailers such as CVS, Rite Aid, Walgreens, and Walmart will stock the two-spray kits in the coming days.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – September 1, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider to be some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, August 26, to Friday, September 1. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Education News:

  • According to Higher Ed Dive, the Department of Education is releasing a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for the first time in 40 years. The new application is set to go live in December, a two-month delay from previous FAFSA’s that could disrupt colleges, states, and financial aid officers across the country.
  • 2,300 student loan borrowers will have some of their loans forgiven after being “cheated” by Ashford University, an online university that allegedly misled students about the cost of tuition and chance of employment after graduating. The Department of Education announced that it would forgive $72 million in loans for students involved.

Health News:

  • A new study by the Air Quality Life Index found that air pollution is more dangerous to humans than smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol. The study comes as parts of America have struggled with bad air quality due to wildfires throughout the summer.
  • A recent analysis in the American Heart Association’s Circulation journal said that “prescribing produce” had positive health benefits. As a way to combat food insecurity, patients in the analysis received vouchers for a median of $63 per month to purchase free or reduced-price produce. According to an ABC article on the analysis, more research needs to be done. However, results show that patients saw an increase in produce consumption and a decrease in chance of being food insecure.
  • New research reflects that 21 percent of marijuana users have some level of cannabis use disorder. Of that that 21 percent, 6.5 percent reported “moderate to severe” disorder.
  • Deborah Birx, former White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator under Donald Trump, said in an interview with ABC News that the government should increase their COVID response in the midst of a recent uptick in cases.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – August 25, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider to be some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, August 19, to Friday, August 25. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Education News:

  • As kids get ready to return to the classroom, schools across the country are navigating how to address a trend of teacher vacancies. New research shows that the increase in teaching vacancies is indicative that the trend extends beyond the pandemic, and schools should focus on how to mitigate the issue of filling America’s classrooms.
  • On Wednesday, Republican presidential candidates took to the stage for the first official GOP debate. The candidates discussed the state of education, with some even calling to eliminate the U.S. Department of Education. Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has been known for focusing on education in his own state, like the Parental Rights in Education Act.
  • A recent report shows that Gen Z’s interest in college is continuing to decline―translating to an 8 percent decrease in college enrollment from 2019 to 2022.

Health News:

  • ABC News’ chief medical correspondent shared on a segment this week that unfortunately, people cannot “catch up” on sleep. This means that people should always aim for 7+ hours a night of sleep to make sure they’re feeling their best.
  • A new poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation reflects that Americans may be struggling to accurately navigate health misinformation. According to the survey, 4 in 10 people said they were aware of falsely reported statements about COVID-19, reproductive health, and gun violence.
  • A recent study in JAMA Pediatrics found that increased screen time for babies may lead to a higher risk of developmental delays by the age of 2. One doctor quoted in a CNN story about the study said that being on a screen takes them away from practicing their motor, communication, and emotional skills.

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