A Recap of This Week’s Top News – January 6, 2023

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.  

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, December 31, to Friday, January 6. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability. 

Here’s what you need to know.

Politics and Policy:

  • The Justice Department announced that the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) will be able to continue delivering prescription abortion medication. This comes after restrictions on some medications were lifted by the FDA in December 2021 to allow them to be sent by mail and after the overturning of Roe v. Wade by the Supreme Court in June 2022.
  • The Biden administration has asked the Supreme court to uphold its student loan forgiveness plan. It argued that this plan does not need congressional authorization and rejected legal challenges from Republican-led states. This comes a month after the Court agreed to expedite the case. The Justices will hear arguments in February.

Health News:

  • A new study released in the journal Pediatrics found that between 2017 and 2021 the number of reported cases of children under six accidentally consuming cannabis edibles rose from about 200 to 3,054. Most children were exposed to the drug at home and suffered mild impacts. However, 22.7% of children were hospitalized and 8% of them needed critical care.
  • Many people are turning to Mounjaro and Ozempic—brand-name drugs typically used to treat diabetes—for weight loss. Both drugs serve to curb an individual’s appetite and slow the stomach from emptying. They are now in such high demand that individuals who use them to treat diabetes are finding a shortage.
  • The CDC warned that that diabetes diagnoses are expected to rise in the coming decades among young Americans. They cited a recent study which shows a 700% increase in Type 2 diabetes diagnoses among Americans under 20 years old by 2060.

Education News:

  • U.S. News & World Report announced that it is changing its law school ranking formula after intense criticism from schools about how they are ranked. Over a dozen law schools decided not to participate this year, including Yale and Georgetown, and some of them stated that they will continue to do so, despite these changes.

Opinions/Perspectives:

  • Columnist Jay Mathews with The Washington Post analyzed claims that inflated grades, reduced homework, and credit recovery courses are contributing to learning loss and detrimental to student success. Mathews cited education experts who have found that these “shortcuts” either contribute negligibly increased high school graduation rates; experts also found that if they are contributing, those contributions are necessary to ensure that students obtain high school diplomas and improve their chances at success after graduation.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – December 16, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health, education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, December 10 to Friday, December 16. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • Vaccine misinformation is named one of the biggest threats to public health after a Kaiser Family Foundation report revealed 28% of adults were against vaccination requirements for school children, compared to 16% in 2019.
  • The Biden administration is once again offering free rapid COVID-19 tests this winter as cases rise across the country. Households can order four tests at CovidTests.gov.
  • The number of deaths in the United States decreased the past two years—down 3% from 2020 and 7% from 2021—which could mark the “first annual decline since 2009” according to preliminary data. Despite the decrease, numbers are still not down to pre-pandemic levels.
  • new report shows that only 14% of diagnosed cancers in the United States are detected by recommended screenings. The remaining diagnoses are due to patients experiencing symptoms or seeking medical care for other reasons.

Education Policy:

Advancements in Health:

  • An experimental skin cancer vaccine saw a 44% reduced risk of recurrence or death. The vaccine, which combines an mRNA vaccine from Moderna with Merck’s Keytruda, will need to show more positive results in a Phase 3 trial before the FDA considers it for the market.
  • A new study showed that COVID-19 vaccines have prevented over 3 million deaths in the past two years. According to the study, the United States could have experienced 4 times as many deaths and 1.5 times as many infections without the vaccines.
  • A recent study showed that people who contracted COVID-19 early in the pandemic were over 1.6 times more likely to experience anxiety and depression in the months following their infection. While many studies have linked the pandemic to worsening mental health, this study specifically analyzed the effect of contracting COVID-19 viruses.
  • On Tuesday, Federal officials proposed that pandemic-enacted emergency policies to expand access to opioid addiction treatments become permanent.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – December 9, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, December 3, to Friday, December 9. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • COVID-19 hospitalizations are on the rise again in the U.S. after Thanksgiving. Last week they reached their highest level in three months. Public health authorities are concerned that increased COVID hospitalizations will overstrain hospitals already struggling with increased numbers of patients due to upticks in flu and RSV cases.
  • This year, we’re seeing the worst flu outbreak in more than a decade. After Thanksgiving, flu-related hospitalizations almost doubled, hitting those over 65 and under 4 years old especially hard. Despite this, 4 in 10 Americans say they don’t plan to get a flu shot this year.

Health News:

  • A new JAMA analysis of COVID clinical trials found that women were underrepresented in studies of drugs used to treat people with COVID. It also found that Black and Asian participants were underrepresented in trials for COVID vaccines.

Education News:

  • According to an analysis of the testing data by the nonprofit NWEA, pandemic-related achievement gaps in reading and math are shrinking for students in grades 3–8. However, for some students, especially Black and Hispanic students and students from high-poverty schools, learning recovery could take over five years.
  • Major U.S. teacher unions lost more than 59,000 members during the 2021–22 school year. However, these declines can’t be attributed to district staffing levels; between September 2021 and September 2022, local schools added 95,000 employees. The decline in membership comes after an 82,000-member loss the previous year.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – December 2, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, November 26, to Friday, December 2. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • On Thursday, the Supreme Court announced its plans to expedite the review of Biden’s plan to cancel federal student loan debt. The Biden administration asked for permission to move forward with loan forgiveness as the legality of the program is challenged in court, but the request was denied by justices.
  • High schoolers in California fought to lower the voter age and participate in the midterm elections, only to be ignored after convincing a supermajority of the electorate.
  • The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn that measles, an infectious disease, could be making a comeback. Although preventable, the disease could become an “imminent threat” globally.
  • After the COVID-19 pandemic put severe stress on the health workforce and infrastructure, the CDC is awarding more than $3 billion to strengthen them.

Health News:

  • Anthony Fauci says that spiking respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cases among children are at a critical juncture and will hopefully begin to decline soon. The rise in cases is cause for concern as pediatrics in the hospital system are overwhelmed.
  • After a full year, the omicron variant of COVID-19 is still causing surges in infection of the virus.

Advancements in Health:

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – November 18, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, November 12, to Friday, November 18. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • A new study suggests smoking marijuana may be more harmful to a person’s lungs than cigarettes. Health experts concerned about the drug’s impact on lung health call for additional research as more states move to legalize the drug.
  • According to a new study, approximately 1 billion minors across the nation could suffer from hearing loss. This comes as a result of exposure to unsafe listening practices, including listening to content at a noise level above the national average.

Policy:

  • The Biden administration appealed the most recent ruling from a Texas federal judge to block student loan forgiveness. Although, before the judge’s ruling on Thursday, the processing of student loan forgiveness had already been paused due to a temporary stay issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals in a separate lawsuit.

Advancements in Health:

  • According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a new antidote for opioid overdose may be available for over-the-counter use in some forms. Naloxone, the new drug, can be taken as a nasal spray or be auto injected. As of now, doctors can prescribe the antidote, but it is also available in some states without a prescription.

Rethinking Educational Approaches:

  • Of late, a dominant change continues to shift higher education admission policies. According to the U.S. Dept of Ed, between the fall of 2019 and 2021, 800 institutions have adjusted their policies to no longer require standardized test scores.

Rather than go private, Black families are opting to embrace pod schooling permanently beyond the pandemic. The movement is viewed as a positive alternative to a public education system that has historically caused their children to falter.

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