A Recap of This Week’s Top News – December 2, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, November 26, to Friday, December 2. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • On Thursday, the Supreme Court announced its plans to expedite the review of Biden’s plan to cancel federal student loan debt. The Biden administration asked for permission to move forward with loan forgiveness as the legality of the program is challenged in court, but the request was denied by justices.
  • High schoolers in California fought to lower the voter age and participate in the midterm elections, only to be ignored after convincing a supermajority of the electorate.
  • The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn that measles, an infectious disease, could be making a comeback. Although preventable, the disease could become an “imminent threat” globally.
  • After the COVID-19 pandemic put severe stress on the health workforce and infrastructure, the CDC is awarding more than $3 billion to strengthen them.

Health News:

  • Anthony Fauci says that spiking respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cases among children are at a critical juncture and will hopefully begin to decline soon. The rise in cases is cause for concern as pediatrics in the hospital system are overwhelmed.
  • After a full year, the omicron variant of COVID-19 is still causing surges in infection of the virus.

Advancements in Health:

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – November 18, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, November 12, to Friday, November 18. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • A new study suggests smoking marijuana may be more harmful to a person’s lungs than cigarettes. Health experts concerned about the drug’s impact on lung health call for additional research as more states move to legalize the drug.
  • According to a new study, approximately 1 billion minors across the nation could suffer from hearing loss. This comes as a result of exposure to unsafe listening practices, including listening to content at a noise level above the national average.

Policy:

  • The Biden administration appealed the most recent ruling from a Texas federal judge to block student loan forgiveness. Although, before the judge’s ruling on Thursday, the processing of student loan forgiveness had already been paused due to a temporary stay issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals in a separate lawsuit.

Advancements in Health:

  • According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a new antidote for opioid overdose may be available for over-the-counter use in some forms. Naloxone, the new drug, can be taken as a nasal spray or be auto injected. As of now, doctors can prescribe the antidote, but it is also available in some states without a prescription.

Rethinking Educational Approaches:

  • Of late, a dominant change continues to shift higher education admission policies. According to the U.S. Dept of Ed, between the fall of 2019 and 2021, 800 institutions have adjusted their policies to no longer require standardized test scores.

Rather than go private, Black families are opting to embrace pod schooling permanently beyond the pandemic. The movement is viewed as a positive alternative to a public education system that has historically caused their children to falter.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – November 11, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health, education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, November 5 to Friday, November 11. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • Student groups rallied together this week to encourage their peers to vote in midterm elections.
  • Daylight-Saving Time ended on Sunday, bringing legislation on enforcing year-long DST to the surface yet again. Here’s why implementing it could be harmful.
  • Boston study found that masking in schools significantly cut COVID-19 infections. The study compared infection rates from school districts in the greater Boston area, only two of which maintained mask mandates for students. The results: no matter what kind of mask students wore; masking was linked with “significantly reduced” cases of COVID-19.
  • The CDC reported a deadly listeria outbreak linked to deli meat and cheese that currently spans six states. As of November 11, 16 people have been infected, and 13 have been hospitalized.
  • recent study found that hospitalizations due to eating disorders in young adults nearly doubled during the pandemic. The numbers have decreased since their 2021 peak, but have not yet returned to pre-pandemic levels.

Education Policy:

  • School districts across the country bear the responsibility of implementing evidence-based strategies to counter the challenge of recent National Assessment of Educational Progress results.  

Advancements in Health:

The days of counting your COVID-19 vaccines may be over. Keeping with the idea of a yearly COVID-19 shot, many people can keep track of their vaccination status by making sure they get their shot yearly – much like a flu shot. 

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – November 4, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health, education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, October 29 to Friday, November 4. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • On Monday, conservative justices “seemed open to ending decades of Supreme Court precedent allowing race-conscious admission decisions at colleges and universities.” The judges doubted “the institutions would ever concede an ‘endpoint’ in their use of race to build diverse student bodies.”
  • Flu season is arriving early, with the highest severity in over a decade. According to the CDC, it is estimated that there have been at least 880,000 flu illnesses, 6,900 hospitalizations, and 360 deaths from flu so far this season.
  • The University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Norfolk State University, and dozens of other schools in the commonwealth have changed their policies, relaxing admissions exam requirements.
  • On Tuesday, the University of Florida’s board of trustees unanimously voted for Senator Ben Sasse, Republican of Nebraska, as the university’s next president.

Education Policy:

  • Alberto Carvalho, Superintendent of Los Angeles Unified School District, said that the district is working to further implement the science of reading into its curriculum. He emphasized the need to train early elementary teachers in evidence-based practices and ensure struggling students have access to extra support.

Advancements in Health:

  • On Tuesday, Pfizer announced that its experimental respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine effectively prevented severe infections in infants after being given to expectant mothers in the second half of pregnancy.
  • Researchers from Spain and Australia studying the venom of the Australian southern sand octopus have identified a compound that may significantly slow cancer growth and help fight drug resistance in patients with one of the most serious forms of skin cancer, BRAF-mutated melanoma.

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A Recap of This Week’s Top News – October 28, 2022

Changes to policy, scientific discovery, and expert recommendations and opinions all have the power to rapidly influence the landscape of a sector. Whether you’re a leader at a non-profit, a member of a university’s marketing department, or a stakeholder for a public health agency, being informed about the latest industry happenings can be the difference between exceeding and falling short of organizational goals. At Hager Sharp, our experts vigorously scan media coverage to identify areas of opportunity. And now, with the introduction of the Sharp Round-Up, you too can review what we consider some of the top news of the week.

Below you will find a compilation of news spanning the health and education, labor, and economy sectors. This list includes mainstream, DC-focused, and trade publication coverage from Saturday, October 22, to Friday, October 28. Let these clips serve as a resource when developing thoughtful strategies and use them to further foster organizational innovation and adaptability.

Here’s what you need to know.

Mainstream News:

  • According to an analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about three in four high school students reported experiencing at least one potentially traumatic event during the pandemic.
  • The results from a national exam, known as the Nation’s Report Card, showed the pandemic’s devastating impact on students, with math scores dropping in every state and English scores dipping as well.

Education Policy:

  • Despite a temporary stay issued by a federal appeals court, the Biden administration encourages borrowers to keep applying for student loan forgiveness.
  • new law enacted last week in Michigan requires the state’s school districts to post parents’ rights in school offices and rooms where boards of education meet.

Advancements in Health:

  • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is planning new regulations to inform women about their breast tissue type and screening options, as mammograms sometimes fail to detect tumors in women with higher breast density.
  • Reproductive health advocates are pushing the FDA to make contraceptives available without a prescription before the advisory panel meeting next month.
  • As an effort to stop a polio outbreak in the New York City metropolitan area, the CDC is considering using the novel oral polio vaccine for the first time in 20 years.
  • First Lady Jill Biden and Mary J. Blige are teaming up with the American Cancer Society following the Biden administration’s resurrection of the “cancer moonshot” initiative.

Opinions:

  • The global food production and distribution system is teetering, and one in ten people do not know where or when they will get their next meal. We must increase our efforts to solve the global nutrition problem.

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